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Malaysia Merdeka Day

Malaysia has grown from an undeveloped backwater to a vibrant modern country. I say this with no disrespect to our New Zealand hosts, but Malaysia has surpassed NZ in terms of economic, physical and infrastructural development. This development has come with environmental degradation but I think people are starting to realise that a pragmatic balance between human needs and environmental conservation must be struck if we want our country to continue to prosper. We still lack behind NZ in terms of social development and mindset, but we are getting there.


Malaysia is a unique country. 52 years ago, our founding fathers of all races were bonded together in a marriage of convenience in order to gain freedom from our colonial masters. I would go so far as to say that it was a shotgun wedding. Naturally, there had been, and will continue to be disagreements, arguments and pain. Think about it. When we were younger, I am sure that we have had fights with our siblings. I never failed to get into fistfights everyday with my younger brother. This was between our own flesh and blood, not even other people from different races and cultures. Yet, at the end of the day, we are brothers, sailors of the same ship.

Having said that, we must also remember the fragile nature of our country’s socio-political climate. Our continued economic development depends on a stable environment and this must be preserved with utmost effort. I do not subscribe to the principle of “absolute freedom of speech” that many Western countries like to claim they practice. From what I have seen, the West, like on many other issues are “cakap tak bikin serupa” when it comes to this. 

There are many irresponsible Malaysians who are stoking the fires of hatred, conveniently ignoring the Social Contract that our founding fathers agreed to. Sensitive issues like religion and race must be approached with caution and tact.  Malaysia is not Britain or America or Europe. We have our own historical, cultural and political mold and should not mindlessly ape whatever the West purportedly claim to be. I am also dismayed that some who are my fellow Muslims, have taken to insulting the Prophet Muhammad and Islam in general, just to advance their political views. One high-profile person of somewhat royal-lineage, whom I shall not name, has taken this route and thus, in my opinion, Muslims should view him with extreme suspicion.

We must always be mindful of what we say in public. It is one thing to have personal views on something; it is another to say it out loud. We must weigh the consequences of our actions before acting. There is a Malay proverb that goes: terlajak perahu boleh diundur, terlajak kata badan binasa. The last phrase refers to “badan”, meaning human body. I would extend this concept of body to the social body, the people of Malaysia too. I apologize for the political nature of this post. Yet, when dealing with Merdeka, I can not help but to be political.

Padi at Malaysia





padiPaddy/Padi
Padi grains when ripe for harvesting is golden brownish in color. The padi farmers, would cut the stalks and bunched them up into bundles.

To remove the grains from its stalk, the padi farmers would "swipe" a bundle against a slated platform with a grain receiver below.

The grains collected are sent to a winnowing machine to remove the husk/chaff. The brownish rice is further processed to get the white, polished rice grain.

A Malay village is never completed without the scenery of a padi field. The field is also known as "bendang" or "sawah".

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Batu Feringgi

De hoofdstraat.....
Batu Ferringhi

Batu Ferringhi has a several large resort, like Rasa Sayang, Golden Sands, Park Royal, Bayview etc. It looks like a new village, but it's very old. It used to be a kampong with a little fishing village. If you want to see a part of this old village you have to turn right when you have passed the Park Royal. Here you'll find the backpackers guesthouses of Ah BengBaba's, and the best place, Ali's, which has a relaxing open-air cafe and garden, and better rooms than the other ones. The guesthouses are facing the sea.

The main road runs more or less straight along the coast for 3km, on which all the hotels, tourist shop, internet cafe's, motorcycle rental offices and restaurants (House of Kampong, Deep Sea or The Last Drop e.o.), are lined up side by side. In the centre you'll find the Telekom office, post office, police station and clinic.
You can get to Batu Ferringhi by taxi, car or bus. It takes a thirty-minute bus ride west of Georgetown on Transitlink #202 or Transitlink air-con #93.
There is a bus from the airport (Bayan Lepas) to Batu Ferringhi. The journey takes approx. 1 hour and 10 minutes. The fare is RM.4.00  The 102 bus departs from the outside of Departure Hall at Level 1. The bus leaves the airport hourly at 7am, 8am, 9am, 10am.......
A taxi ride will cost you RM60.- You'll have to buy a coupon for the taxi when leave the arrival hall after collecting your luggage.

The beach itself is quite good, thought not up there with Malaysia's best and the water is not of the tropically clear variety you might expect. The beach is kept clean, even on weekends when hordes of day-trippers visit.
Bathing areas are often cordoned off by floating buoys to protect swimmers from speeding jet-skis and water-skiers. Jellyfish, particularly at rainy times, can be a problem.
Batu Ferringhi can be crowded and much of the greenery has been replaced by concrete, but also the advantages (plenty of restaurants, watering holes and recreation facilities). It has quite a lively resort feel, and there is a good night markets on the main road selling trinkets.
The big hotels offer good deals at times and cheaper accommodation is available if you want a few days by the beach.
At the corner: Nando
Restaurants, shops and KFC...
Batu Ferringhi has a few small shops selling souvenirs and beach necessities, in addition to several money changers and pushy Indian tailors. Stalls selling a variety of goods set up along the road at night. If you're looking for cheap clothes, fabrics, souvenirs, electronic items, watches, DVDs, CDs and more? Then the Pasar Malam along the road is the place for you.
A wider selection of articles and some sophistication at several air-conditioned shopping complexes in George Town. A taxi ride to the centre (Komtar, Pranging Mall - shopping complexes in George Town) will cost you RM25.-. A ticket for the local bus will cost you RM2.-

Guesthouse  "Ali"  has an open air bar
The rate of the hotels in Batu Ferringhi are expensive. There are some hawker centres in Batu Ferringhi, like Global Bay. This is a noisy Hawker centre with a big screen tv. It has a roof, but it's very noisy.
The cheap hotels are in Tanjong Bungah: Tanjong Bungah (Flamingo on the Beach, Copthorne Orchid, Paradise Sandy Bay, Tanjong Bunga Beach). These hotels have great offers (RM 100.- per room), but for night life you'll have to go to Batu Ferringhi of George Town.


The Rasa Sayang Garden *****
The Bayview Beach Hotel is the last one in Batu Ferringhi. If you're going out at night, you'll have to walk a while (quarter of an hour) before you're in the centre of the village: the pasar malam. Perhaps that's the reason, why this hotel has great offers!
Close to the Bayview is the Hard Rock Hotel. A very nice hotel with a Hard Rock Café and a Hard Rock Shop.
Golden Sands
The Golden Sands*****
The Golden Sands is a family hotel. It has a social activity program and several swimming pools. They have a wonderful restaurant ""Sigi's at the sea", but if you don't like a hotel restaurant, there's a hawker centre opposite of the hotel (Global Bay). Beside the hotel is a narrow street, where you can lunch or let yourself a suit fit by a tailor.
The sister hotel Rasa Sayang is under renovation at the moment.

The Baba and Nyonya Heritage

The Baba and Nyonya Heritage

The Baba and Nyonya Heritage

Baba and Nyonya are Chinese of noble descendants that have adopted much of the Malay culture into theirs. They are also known as 'Straits-born Chinese' or 'Peranakans'. The public can now view the heirloom unique to this heritage at the Baba & Nyonya Heritage Museum (a private museum) run by the Babas and Nyonyas of Melaka at Jalan Tun Tan Cheng Lock.


The Baba and Nyonya Heritage
The Baba and Nyonya Heritage

Melaka's Sultanate Palace

Melaka's Sultanate Palace

Malacca Sultanate Palace is an exquisite piece of Malay architecture and is a replica of the original 15th century palace of Malacca's extinct Sultanate. The palace is built based on sketches found in the ancient Sejarah Melayu (Malay Annals). This wooden replica of the Sultan's palace houses the Malacca Cultural Museum. Melaka's Sultanate Palace

Facing the palace is the Historic City Memorial Garden. An intriguing monument to commemorate the declaration of Malacca as a Historic City is the showpiece of this garden. The monument is topped with a replica of a Malay royal headress, a symbol of Malaysians' allegiance to the throne.

A Famosa




After the Portuguese captured Melaka (Malay name for Malacca) in 1511, they built a fortress to defend themselves. The fortress, called A'Famosa was practically destoyed during the Dutch invasion in 1641. Only one gate of this fortress is preserved today.

Sumanje Love about melacca 


A Famosa, or "The Famous" in Portuguese, is among the oldest surviving European architectural remains in Asia. Once part of a mighty fortress, this tiny gate (called the Porta de Santiago) is all that is left of a once-mighty fortress. In 1511 a Portuguese fleet arrived under the command of Alfonso de Albequerque. His forces attacked and successfully defeated the armies of the native Sultanate. Moving quickly to consolidate his gains, Albequerque had the fortress built around a natural hill near the sea. Albequerque believed that Melaka would become an important port linking Portugal to the spice trade from China. At his time other Portuguese were establishing outposts in such places as Macau, China and Goa, India in order to create a string of friendly ports for ships heading to China and returning home to Portugal.

The fortress once consisted of long ramparts and four major towers. One was a four-story keep, while the others held an ammunition's storage room, the residence of the captain, and an officers' quarters. As the plan below shows, most of the village clustered in town houses inside the fortress walls. As Melaka's population expanded it outgrew the original fort and extensions were added around 1586. The fort changed hands in 1641 when the Dutch successfully drove the Portuguese out of Melaka. The Dutch renovated the gate in 1670, which explains the logo "ANNO 1670" inscribed on the gate's arch. Above the arch is a bas-relief logo of the Dutch East India Company.

A Famosa

The fortress changed hands again in the early 19th century when the Dutch handed it over to the British to prevent it from falling into the hands of Napoleon's expansionist France. The English were wary of maintaining the fortification and ordered its destruction in 1806. The fort was almost totally demolished but for the timely intervention of Sir Stanford Raffles, the founder of Singapore, who happened to visit Melaka in 1810. Because of his passion for history this small gate was spared destruction.

Robinson Waterfall

Walk Path 9 / 9A Tanah Rata
Start from the gardens on Persiaran Dayang Endah and continue to the end of the road. Cross a small bridge on your left to start the walk.

Robinson Waterfall

Robinson Waterfall 
About Malaysia

Cameron Hightlands

Cameron Highlands is Malaysia's lagest and best-known hill resort. Discovered by, and named after William Cameron, a goverment surveyor who, in 1885 explored the area by hacking a path up through dense jungle and came across, "A fine plateau shut in by mountains". At 1524m above sea level the area enjoys a cool climate, with temperatures no higher than 20°C and rarely falling below 10°C, a welcome change to the generally oppressive heat and humisity at sea level.Cameron Highlands


Without doubt the most interesting aspect of a visit to the resort is its tea plantations, the first of which were established in 1929 by John Archibald Russell and belong to the most famous Malaysian tea producer, Boh Tea. The estates are wonderfully manicured and visitors are welcome to view the factory production process and enjoy a cuppa' at the tea shop.

                             Other interesting places to visit include the numerous vegetable farms dotted all around the area. There are also strawberry farms, flower nurseries, butterfly farms, a challenging 18 hole golf course and for the more adventurious various jungle treks. The three main highlands towns are Ringlet, Tanah Rata and Brinchang with most visitors staying in and around the latter two. Accommodation varies from small inexpensive hotels and guest houses, to self-catering apartments and first class hotels. Any time of year is suitable for a visit, but try to avoid the main public and school holiday periods as the area can become very busy.

                           It is also best to be prepared for the 2 hour journey from the entry point at Tapah to Tanah Rata, the drive is not steep and is extremely interesting, but the road is quite narrow and very winding, so drive carefully and try to stop occasionally to enjoy the various sights along the way. These include the impressive Lata Iskandar waterfall, amazing tropical vegetation and various Orang Asli (indigenous people) dwellings. Without doubt Cameron Highlands is the place to visit on Peninsular Malaysia.

Songket Weaving - Malaysia

Srivijaya governed the Southeast Asian sea route from the 7 th century - lured merchants from the east and the west to trade under well-organised and protected conditions. Vague evidence seems to suggest that Srivijaya's rule began to crumble in the 13 th century, this gave other trading ports the opportunity to divert merchant ships with promises of trade opportunities. One such port was Melaka, which swiftly took charge of the trading route down the Straits of Melaka. Traders exchanged goods at the port, shipping basic necessities such as rice, sugar, pottery and luxury items such as silk yarns, gold and silver for ivory, tortoiseshell, resin, waxes, sandalwood, spices and other jungle products abound in the region's rainforest. Textiles were brought in to trade or as gifts for the Sultan and his entourage. It is noted that the royal court clothed in textiles were very much influenced by Indian weaving and design methods. The courts' controlled the textile trade and by the 15 th century, Melaka was trading in a variety of luxurious textiles including fine silks, gold threads and brocade. Weavers were no longer restricted to the use of local materials.

It is not certain as to the songket's place of origin but the Kelatanese believe that this weaving technique came from the North, somewhere in the Cambodia-Siam region and expanded south into Pattani and finally to Kelantan and Terengganu. However, Terengganu weavers believe that Indian traders brought songket weaving to Palembang and Jambi where it probably originated during the time of Srivijaya.
Much documentation is sketchy about the origins of the songket but it is most likely that songket weaving was brought to Peninsular Malaysia through intermarriages between royal families. This was a common occurrence in the 15 th century for sealing strategic alliances. 

                These royal women would bring along their personal weavers with their entourage. Although the term menyongket means 'to embroider with gold or silver threads', the Malay songket is not embroidered. The songket utilises an intricate supplementary weft technique where gold threads are woven in between the longitudinal silk threads of the background cloth. This rich and luxurious fabric demonstrated the social structure of the Malay elite. The symbolism of thread colours to signify the status and title of the Court has been in use since the period of the Melaka Sultanate during the reign of Sultan Muhammad Shah (1426 - 1446, Sejarah Melayu). White gold thread was the colour of the ruler, yellow for the crown prince, blue or violet for the prime minister and so on. Sultan Muhammad Shah himself preferred to be dressed in 'Malay Attire' as he refused to emulate foreign clothing. 

                       The royal court weavers would produce individualised motifs often created by the wearers themselves. This rich textile was transformed from a mere form of attire into a canvas for individuality, personal triumphant, and was regarded as a symbol of prestige not only within the court arena but on an international stage.
In the past two decades, kain songket has been introduced into a wider audience of culturally conscious wearers. Terengganu has the highest concentration of songket weavers in Malaysia. With the gradual reintroduction of songket into the Malay Culture, there seems to be a stronger reason for the locals to take up weaving as a profession. 

Pura Tanjung Sabtu

                Art, culture and tradition is sometimes most difficult to explain if taken away from the environment in which it was born. Pura Tanjung Sabtu, a complex of historic wooden palaces is home and atelier to Yang Mulia Tengku Ismail bin Tengku Su. Tengku Ismail is a man of vision - a gentleman who believes in the Malay Identity and acknowleges the importance of maintaining that foundation for the future.
                  Tengku Ismail is second cousin to Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin of Terengganu. He was brought up in traditional royal manner in the inner court of Dalam Kota Istana Maziah on the palace grounds of Kuala Terengganu. His love for the childhood memories would undoubtedly have planted a seed in his passion for restoring old Terengganu wooden houses. But the passion was ignited when he went on a trip to Kyoto in 1970 where he visited the 17th century wooden palaces of the shoguns. He was completely taken aback by how well the Japanese had preserved their historical milestones. 

               After his schooling tenure at Westminster College, London, he returned to his beloved Terengganu However, his excitement turned into dismay by what he saw. The years that he had been away, much of Terengganu's traditional architecture had fallen into disuse. Many homes have been renovated with modern designs that have all but obliterated the original designs.
His dreams to impede the loss of Terengganu's traditional architecture became a reality upon working on a race against time to restore the importance of Songket in Malay culture. 

                            Tengku Ismail used his large collection of antique songket to reinstate the traditions of songket wear amongst royal families. Soon, orders for songket pieces were streaming in and a small cottage industry was set up. With income from the sale of songkets, Tengku Ismail realised his dream and began the hunt for old houses as early as the 1980's . He eventually bought eleven 100 - 160 year old wooden houses from villagers in Terengganu. With the help of a team of skilled local craftsmen headed by a grand old gentlemen of 95years old, Tok Ayah Teh Sar, Tengku Ismail had the 11 houses dismantled and reinstalled 9 houses into a complex on his land, surrounded by 14 acres of landscaped gardens, lawns, orchards, fields with a dreamy stream running through this lush piece of paradise.
Tengku Ismail had to inject a little creativity in designing the complex. Since all the wooden houses were originally individual entities, the complex has included a main hall or a 'balai' instead of the traditional layout and then then stretched into an east wing and a west wing.

                        Guests are met by their host at the balai called Rumah Ibu Seberang Baroh. Incidentally, all the houses are named after the villagers where they originated from eg. Rumah Sungai Rengas, Rumah Kuala Ibai and Rumah Rhu Rendang. The back portion of Rumah Ibu Seberang Baroh is an extended patio where wayang kulit (traditional puppet theatre) performances and silat (Malay martial art) demos are held.
Tengku Ismail retains the west wing as his private residence but opens the rest to the public. Two of the wooden houses in the east wings are guesthouses, another is reserved as a songket gallery. There's a dining area where visitors can enjoy home cooked Malay cuisine in the comfort of traditional surroundings and tranquility of village life. 

Bibah Songket
Puan Hajjah Habibah believes that although motifs can be a combination of new and of traditional designs, she makes no compromise on the quality of the weaving and the material. Every single step of traditional songket weaving is followed through as did master weavers of the sultan's centuries ago . However, even in the earlier years, Kak Bibah knew that she could lift the beauty of songket to a new level by adding a variety of coloured threads where traditionally only silver or gold threads were used. With that, she introduced a new weaving technique to accommodate a variety of colour threads that could be added to the songket piece. Her years spent working with the Iban (Indigenous tribe in Sarawak) students on the ikat pua also gave her the idea of combining both the ikat pua and the songket to produce a unique songket range. 


She spent a great amount of time after that perfecting her discoveries.
Going back to the roots of traditional malay songket weaving, Bibah set up her factory in Terengganu at a small village called Kampung Rhu Rengeh. She trained her master weavers from scratch and after years of preserverence, her efforts are beginning to fruit. The young weavers whom she hires from the nearby villages have developed such skills and confidence that they often shun simple designs for more intricate ones. 


Kak Bibah's hands-on dedication has inspired many of her young weavers and for others who have married and moved away to other villages, she continues to provide them with supplementary income by setting up looms in their homes so that they can weave in their leisure time. This small but significant cottage industry of songket weaving is taking a big circle and returning the art and traditions of the Malays to the people. 


Kak Bibah believes in transforming art into all she touches. Batik and songket allows her to expand her artistic horizons but she also takes heed in producing songket that flows and is soft to the skin so that the textile can fall gently onto the contours of the wearer, complementing the physique. Her attention to detail and the quality to create her pieces warrants apiece made in at least 3months but the wearer and buyer can be assured of the making of an heirloom for years of appreciation and pride. 

Having established a ready market for traditional use of songket, Kak Bibah continues to expand the horizon of opportunities for songket. Exclusive Malaysian Resorts use songket to infuse modern and traditional to form a crystal-clear Malaysian identity. State Houses and Government buildings adorn their foyers and amphitheatres with songket panelling to reinforce Malaysia's heritage.
Today, the Songket is sublime. It has finally developed a story, a lovestory enriched with art, passion, tradition and identity. The true Malay Songket.

Tioman Islan v/s Hawaii U.S

We'll start on the island of Oahu, not necessarily because it is my favorite, but because it is the most popular. Here you see the famous Waikiki Beach. Honolulu is the state capital as well as Hawaii's largest city.

Some of the highlights you must see are the Polynesian Cultural Center, the famous surf on the North Shore, and Pearl Harbor.
The island of Oahu, known as "The Gathering Place", is the third largest of the Hawaiian Islands and most populous of the islands in the State of Hawaii. The island is home to about 900,000 people. Today, Oahu has become a tourism and shopping haven as over five million visitors flock there every year to enjoy the quintessential island holiday experience that the Hawaiian Islands and their multicultural people now personify.

Hawaiian Islands -- Six main islands including Oahu, Maui, Kauai, Molokai, Lanai and the Hawaii (the Big Island).

Hawaii is the only island state in the United States.

Pulau Tioman

Like a giant sleeping dragon, the dark green ridges of Tioman Island rise up above the waters of the South China Sea. On closer inspection, it becomes clear that the dragon’s dark green scales are in fact giant trees and impenetrable jungle; that the grey claws are giant granite boulders and that the dragon’s horns are twin peaks with smooth, straight cliffs, surrounded with swirls of mist.

The dragon-like appearance of Tioman Island is at the root of a legend surrounding its origin: A dragon princess from China was flying to her prince in Singapore and stopped to rest in these calm, warm waters. Enamoured by the beauty of the area, and the waves lapping at her sides, she discontinued her journey and took the form of an island. 


 The waters around the island are filled with corals of all shapes and colours and home to a vast diversity of sea creatures, including two species of marine turtle. There are a few excellent beaches on Tioman, and these curves of golden sand are usually tucked away at the edges of villages or fronting one of the many resorts. 

Rantau Panjang

Malaysia is a shopping paradise. Shopping in Malaysia is a voyage of never ending discovery and continues to be an unforgettable experience, a hunt for the rare treasures of the Orient. Shopping in Malaysia caters to all groups, with products ranging from up-market to mid-range and budget price. Malaysia presents shoppers the best that the region has to offer, international branded designer goods or an intricate local handicraft. The variety of product lines, quality goods as well as the choice of shopping venues has made Malaysia a shopper’s paradise.
In Malaysia having three Mega Sales a year, in March, August and December. Apart from the Mega Sales period, other department stores and retail outlets also have at other times of the year.
Malaysia’s tax havens are Pulau Langkawi and Labuan. Duty free areas are also found at Rantau Panjang and Pengkalan Kubur in Kelantan, Padang Besar and Bukit Kayu Hitam in Kedah. An interesting mix of duty free shops can also be found at city centers or airports in Kuala Lumpur, Johor Bahru and Penang.
Malaysian local handicrafts are uniquely. From intricate pewter, silver, brass, pottery and rattan to dazzling colours of Malaysian Batik. The items like designer collections, elegant footwear, exclusive watches, optical items and quality fabrics can found in modern shopping centres. Electrical appliances, electronic equipment, computers and cameras are available too.
Malaysians are not big on presents and a huge smile to accompany your “terima kasih” (thank you) is all that is needed.

Cherating

The first club in South East Asia of Club Med is located in Cherating at the South China Sea. And because it's the first, they got the best spot, although the whole region has fine sandy beach.
After Club Med came the other resorts. like: the Legend, the Impiana Hotel, Holiday Villa and the Residence Inn. All of them are beautiful hotels/resorts. It's a mixture between traditional and modern resorts.
Cherating is situated 47 km from Kuantan. It is unique with its rustic atmosphere and warm hospitality of the village people.  Cherating also offers you the chance to shop for handicrafts and see cultural performances. Village maidens nimbly weave the pandanus leaves into mats, hats, bags, and other inexpensive lightweight souvenirs. Cultural shows include wayang kulit (shadow play) and silat (Malaysian art of self-defense).
Photo: Douwe van Essen
Cherating is approximately 47km north of Kuantan and 133km from Kuala Lumpur. There two ways of getting there - by air (to Kuantan, then taxi or bus) or by car.
It takes about 4 hours to drive from Kuala Lumpur to Kuantan using the inland Karak Highway and its another hour from Kuantan to Cherating. The drive alone is an interesting experience as you pass primary jungles, palm and rubber plantations, historic towns and quirky pit stops.
Cherating also offers you the chance to shop for handicrafts and see cultural performances. Village maidens nimbly weave the pandanus leaves into mats, hats, bags, and other inexpensive lightweight souvenirs. Cultural shows include wayang kulit (shadow play) and silat (Malaysian art of self-defense).
Photo: Douwe van Essen
Some excursions, that can be made:
  • to Kuantan, the capitol of the State of Pahang. Not far from the town center (only a few kilometers) is the beach of Teluk Chempedak. There's a beautiful promenade and some nice restaurants. There are also some excellent "food stalls". It's very pleasant to be there in the evening and they offer you a good meal.
  • Beserah is a fishing village about 10 km north of Kuantan. Beserah is noted for some of the best salted fish in the region. An unusual sight is the way Beserah fishermen utilize water buffaloes on the beach to transport baskets of fish from the boats to the processing centers. These water buffaloes are also used in the padi fields. Beserah has several batik factories and cottage industries which produce handicraft from sea shells and pandanus leaves.
    Please, ask in your hotel, what's the best time to go there the water buffaloes.
  • Lake Chini is a tranquil lake whose legend is similar the Loch Ness in Scotland. This magical lake is also home to rich biological resources of flora and aquatic vertebrates. The aborigines are very convinced that a dragon once lived in this mystical lake. You travel through quaint Malaysian villages and countryside to Lake Chini. Board small boats for a cruise down a stream canopied by century old rain forest trees. Cruise around the lake and take in the scenic views. 

Desaru

Desaru, the popular beach resort, is located on the eastern tip of the peninsula (near Singapore - about 
1½hr drive from Johor Bahru). 
It has clean sandy white beaches with a lush tropical forest that goes for about 25 kilometres. You can walk nearly 50 meters into the sea and still the depth is approximately 4 feet deep).

Desaru is a popular destination for tourists as well as locals. It is a village of casuarinas with 25km of unspoiled beaches and a lush tropical forest.
The  clean water has made many water sporting activities such as snorkelling, fishing, boating and canoeing possible. You can do also other activities without the blue sea. You can do golfing, jungle trekking, horseback riding and tennis.
There are many resorts and hotels here that cater to a variety of budget. There are resorts and hotels for the  budget traveller as well as families seeking fun in the sun.
jet ski

The beaches are lined with casuarina trees dotted by rustic fishing villages. Nearby are cascading falls, natural lakes and jungles where one can go jungle trekking.
To make your visit more memorable, visit Tanjung Pengelih to see  the relics of World War Two and the historical relic of the Malay Johor Riau Empire at Johor Lama.
Getting to the largest district of Johor at the south-eastern end of the peninsula, requires an hour's drive from Johor Baru. From the north, the easiest way is to take the Kulai exit of the North-South Expressway followed by a 90-minute drive to the historic town. The coastal road is a lot more scenic.
There are reliable public transportation services from all major towns. There is a direct ferry service between the Tanah Merah ferry terminal in Singapore and Sebana Cove, about an hour from Kota Tinggi.
Places of interest:

Kota Tinggi WaterfallsAnother popular out-of-town attraction is Kota Tinggi. This attraction of the waterfalls is situated at Lombong. The water cascades from a height of 36m down a steep precipice into a pool deep enough for swimming. The cool waters have beckoned many tourists and locals alike.
It is a good spot to take a fresh mountain air.
The Swiss-style chalets equipped with cooking facilities are available for visitors seeking an overnight visit.
At the base of the falls there are also public changing rooms, camping grounds, and a restaurant.
Teluk Ramunia and Tanjung BalauSome 10km south of Dasaru is another excellent stretch of beach known as Teluk Ramunia.
About 8km north of Desaru (20 minutes) is the Fishermen's Museum at Tanjung Balau which displays fish traps and equipment used by local fishermen and various artefacts of the trade.


Waterfall
Ostrich WonderlandAt this farm are more than 100 ostriches. It's situated in Teluk Ramunia since 2001. At the farm are guides to show you around. The reason of setting up this showfarm is to exhibit the ostriches to the publics and
allowing them to know more about ostriches, their habits, mating seasons etc. It is open daily from 10am to 6pm. Entrance fees are RM8 for adults and RM4 for children below 12.
Group rates of RM6 for 20 or more adults and RM3 for children are also offered.Fruit Farm
The Desaru Fruit Farm is planted with many different types of tropical fruits. Some fruits are seasonal, like Durian, Rambutan and Mangosteen whilst others like Papaya, Banana, Pineapple, Rose Apple, Star Fruit, Lime, Orange and Coconut are available all year round. The experienced guides will give talks on the different plants and show you around the farm in a leisurely bullock-cart ride or in your own vehicle.

Dataran Merdeka- Kuala Lumpur- Malaysia

Kuala Lumpur in the Malay language means Muddy Estuary and was founded in 1857 by the tin miners. As the mining and trading of tin prospered, the town began to develop and since then Kuala Lumpur landmarks have constantly being changed to cater for the growing needs of the city folks. The city was declared a Federal Capital on February 1 1974 and since then the first day of February has always been a holidays for the city dwellers.


Despite the fast pace development of the city, Kuala Lumpur has been able to balance the demands of land for developement. The historical site such as the Sultan Abdul Samad building has being kept and preserved as a national heritage. Greeneries are also planned in the city with potted plants, flowers and green trees co exist together with the modern skyscrapers.
With a population of over 1.3 million and still thriving in full swing, Kuala Lumpur is by far the largest of all cities in Malaysia. Malays, Chinese and Indians comprise the major races among many others in this microcosm of cultures. The multicultural influence of Malaysia is manifested in the customs, religious beliefs and languages of the country. Plan a trip to this amazing hub of unanimity and versatile tradition with AsiaRooms.com offering you all the information regarding Kuala Lumpur Tourist Attractions in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.




Dataran Merdeka (Independence Square) is appropriately named because it was at this place on August 30, 1957 at midnight, the Malayan flag was hoisted for the first time in the country’s history upon gaining independence from the British rule. The flag raising ceremony was held at the very spot where the 100-metre high flagpole now stands. Underneath the flagpole area is Plaza Putra, an underground food, leisure and entertainment complex, as well as an underground parking bay. On the other end of the immaculately-turfed 8.2ha field lies a fountain area with elegant colonnades and colourful rows of zinnias and marigolds, a nice place to rest after a day’s trip.


The Square is well maintained with beautiful gardens, terraces, fountains and a big screen
for screening of main events and live telecasts. Photography session for first timer to this place is a must whether one is a local or a foreign tourist.




This Square continues to be a venue where many events are held. The National Day celebrations and New Year countdown are among the events that are held here. Beneath the square is Plaza Putra where you will be able to find food and entertainment. It also has a car park facility.

Johor Lama Fort (Teluk Sengat)


Johor Lama Fort (Teluk Sengat)Slightly less than half a millennium ago, this small village strategically guarding the upper reaches of the Johor River was the seat of the Johor Sultanate. Though all that remains are a restored earth mount and fragments of stone walls, a fort built in 1540 by Sultan Alauddin Shah - son of the first Johor Sultan - used to exist. The Portuguese who had taken Malacca attacked in 1587 and completely destroyed the fort despite it being defended by 8,000 of the Sultanate’s warriors.
From the Travel Times:

"The fortress made of rocks and turf is said to be one of the best defensive forts built along Sungai Johor to stop the Portuguese after the fall of Malacca. Though "tourists" are only taken to the hilltop fort which now appears as a plain well-maintained field surrounded by bunds, a walk around Kampong Johor will lead to more hidden bunds. Kampong folk say the bunds cover 2.4 km through the rubber plantation surrounding the small kampong.
Also found here are two tombs in two different sites. One near the fort is unidentified while the other in the rubber estate belongs to the royal midwife.
Further upstream is Kampong Panchor which was made a ruling centre by Sultan Abdul Jalil Riayat Shah IV, the 11th Sultan of Johor, under the name Kota Panchor.
Besides the remains of the fort and still-hidden historical relics, the kampong which is surrounded by oil palm plantations takes pride in another two ancient tombs.
Drive through the plantation dirt road to reach an isolated mausoleum of Sultan Muzaffar Syah atop the hill in the middle of Bukit Seluyot. This is located by the river too. The third Sultan of Johor was not alone, for buried in the same resting place was his sister Raja Fatimah and nephew Sultan Abdul Jalil."
This quaint coastal fishing village is well known for its fresh seafood, especially its crab delicacy.
FirefliesYou'll have to go to Kota Tinggi. A rapidly expanding town, the hustle and bustle of this town is charming as the traditional blends well with the modern.
Modern progress is taking place here with many new buildings as well as the Government's plan to move the administrative centre from Johor Bahru to Kota Tinggi.
The boarding point for this firefly excursion is at the riverbank near Jalan Tepi Sungai, opposite the row of shops.
Before going on the boat you'll have to put on life jackets.
These fascinating insects are found in abundance on the berembang trees that line the banks the Johor River. The scene is very beautiful.
You'll have a close encounter with one of nature's mesmerising phenomenon - the beautiful presence of fireflies, glowing in the thousands here.
The boat for the fireflies

Crocodile farmThe Crocodile Farm in Teluk Sengat was established in 1979. There are about 500 crocodiles bred in the farm through natural copulation. These crocodiles belong to the Crocodylus Porosus species. The farm's main export is the crocodile's meat and skin, which can be made into leather goods.
crocodile
There's a wide choice of beach resorts along its long coastline – at Teluk Mahkota, Tanjung Balau, Desaru, Batu Layar, Teluk Punggai and Teluk Ramunia. Those who like to stay near the famous waterfalls of Kota Tinggi can check into the Kota Tinggi Waterfall Resort. In town itself, there is quite a number of budget hotels scattered all over.
Golfers also have a few choices, one of which is Sebana Cove. The all-in-one retreat has a marina, 18-hole course and resort. Guests can choose from 40 executive rooms, 20 suites and 24 two-bedroom apartments housed in two-storey blocks. The main clubhouse has a swimming pool, food and beverage outlets, gymnasium, sauna and tour desk.

Gua Musang

GUA MUSANGRafting on the Nenggiri River
The Nenggiri River flows from the backcountry of Kelantan. From the highlands it meanders its way through a series of rapids and later joins the Kelantan River at Kuala Krai. A section of the river, from Kuala Betis to Kuala Setelu, has become the playground of adventure and nature lovers. This remote area will probably remain unchanged for some years to come. Vast tracks of virgin jungle line both sides of the river broken occasionally by an orang asli settlement and limestone outcrops. Some of Malaysia's richest archaeological caves are to be found along the river: Gua Cha, Gua Chawan and Gua Jaya. These caves are archaeologically important as unlike other caves throughout the Peninsula, they have been undisturbed by guano collectors.


Your adventure begins after your arrival at the timber town of Gua Musang (Pahang/ Kelantan border); from there, you travel by off-road vehicles to Kuala Betis, the usual Put-In-Point.
Here you 'board’ the inflatable rafts for some white-water actions.

You raft along the 53km of the little known Nenggiri River that flows from the backcountry of Kelantan.
En-route you stop to visit GUA CHA Archaeological Site with its mysterious cave and imposing limestone.
Rafting down the river either on bamboo raft or rubber inner tubes is the best form of traversing this section of the river.
Just float down, or paddle if you want to go faster.

A trip of 2/3 days and 1/2 nights will be adequate to cover this section.
Just savour the atmosphere while being accompanied by cacophony of sounds from animals and birds in a jungle environment.
If you are lucky, you may be able to sight them because they are mostly nocturnal creatures.

You spend a night camping in a jungle environment and here you will be sleeping by the ever-present cacophony of the sounds of insects, frogs, birds and an occasional hooting of monkeys.
The river trip ends at Kampong SETAR from when you return by land to Gua Musang, the end of the river journey and adventure to remember.

Tioman Island

      
                   About malaysia.................Tioman Island is a beautiful tear-shaped little island that sits around 36 miles off Malaysia’s east coast, nestled in the South China Sea.   It’s a tranquil tropical wonderland of white, sandy beaches and beautiful coastline that will make you feel like a lucky beachcomber who has stumbled upon paradise.



          Palm trees abound and the twin peaks of Gunung Nenek Semukut provide a great landmark that leads you into thick jungle and countless streams and waterfalls within its interior.
Legend has it that the island’s dragon-like appearance from a distance comes from a story about a dragon princess from China who was flying to meet her prince in Singapore and stopped at the shores of the island, fell in love with its tranquility and decided to stay forever and take on the shape of the island.

Friendly people and quaint little villages can be found within this Tioman Island, which is only 39km long by 12km wide.   It’s a jewel in the South China Sea that’s accessible by ferry, yacht and small plane.   It’s surrounded by white coral reefs, which makes it an incredible place to scuba and snorkel.   With a number of scuba facilities on the island, it’s easy to get suited up and geared up and led out to some great diving sites.   Some of the dive shops on the island can also point you to some great accommodations and can set you up with a whole variety of fun things to do on the island.   After all, divers all stick together and know how to have fun.

Another neat thing about the island is that it’s also inhabited by giant monitor lizards, but it’s nothing to worry about as they’re just local attractions.   Visiting Tioman Island is like visiting a faraway place you’ve only dreamed of.    The movie ‘South Pacific’ was based on the beaches of Tioman and a Time magazine article selected Tioman island as one of the world’s most beautiful islands, so there’s documented history here that deserves a place on your list of treasures to visit

Pulau kapas

Pulau KapasA haven for swimming, snorkeling, windsurfing, kayaking, boating and fishing.

Pulau Kapas abounds in numerous deserted, white sandy beaches lined with shady palm trees to make a perfect niche to laze on. Relaxation is the foremost occupation here. It offer a refreshing change from everyday haste.
The island is just 4 nautical miles from Marang. It's is an ideal place to break away and chill it out. Pulau Kapas is made up of two islands Pulau Gemia and Pulau Kapas. Pulau Kapas is about easy access, choices and plenty of bargain. Places to stay ranging from camping sites to dormitory to island resorts with en suite facilities. Only thing that never change on this island is the constant number of backpackers arriving and departing each day.

 July, August and the local holidays are the best times to go.
An island famous for its clear waters, sandy white beaches and swaying palms, it is relatively isolated. Home to an infinite variety of hard and soft corals, the waters around the island abound with sea-shells, fish and turtles. 
The island's laid back atmosphere is ideal for relaxation but the more adventurous will find it is also a haven for swimming, snorkeling, windsurfing, kayaking, boating and fishing. 
Kapas has somehow become the refuge of those who refuse or could not join the Perhentian' crowd.
The island is favorite with the local people in the very high season and the public holidays. 



A taxi from Kuala Terengganu airport or the bus terminal costs RM 30.00 per cab for the journey to Marang Jetty. Boat transfer service may start as early as 7:00 and costs RM 25.00 per person (two way).
Services such as snorkelling around the island is very much standardised and priced accordingly. The standard price of equipment is RM5 per day for mask & tuba and RM5 per day for fins.
Tourist are never been over charged on these services. The only item that sometimes may seemed over priced are the food. Be sure that all menu has price listed before ordering.
Just north of the pier, a couple of small restaurants serves the cheapest basic dishes of the island : Nasi or Mee Goreng. The first one gives good portions and sell big bottle of mineral water. One of the best local eating place on this island is at Zaki's. 
Due to its close proximity to shore, Pulau Kapas is exposed to the occasional visits from unwelcome parties.
Be sure that any valuables is locked in the room or better still be carried along where ever you go. Local islanders is always helpful and on the watch for these trouble makers. Anyone caught on any unlawful acts will be deal with accordingly. However, they did not guarantee that your belonging will not be stolen. Mosquito can be a serious nuisance at dusk and dawn. Most resorts have mosquito net but for the outdoors, bring enough repellent.

Tucked within breezy coconut groves, traditional huts adorn selected stretches of the spotless beach. Leisurely splashing and snorkelling around with a playful but shy variety of fishes are pleasant and undemanding pursuits. Play spot the turtles and pay your silent underwater tribute to the colours of the sea shells besides wind-surfing, kayaking and boating.
Previously a well-guarded secret amongst members of the diving community, Kapas has now become more accessible with the building of the Primula Kapas Island Resort.
Pulau Kapas offers a variety of adventures to the Sun and Sea lovers. The hidden sweats of nature's splendors both on land and below the sea. You could track into the island's interior and amazed at the colorful natural flora and fauna along the way. Explore the most varied marine life among the many coral reefs around the island. Snorkeling and underwater diving is popular along stretches of shallow coral reefs of the island's western shore.

Kapas, a view from Marang

Pulau kapas

Pulau KapasA haven for swimming, snorkeling, windsurfing, kayaking, boating and fishing.

Pulau Kapas abounds in numerous deserted, white sandy beaches lined with shady palm trees to make a perfect niche to laze on. Relaxation is the foremost occupation here. It offer a refreshing change from everyday haste.
The island is just 4 nautical miles from Marang. It's is an ideal place to break away and chill it out. Pulau Kapas is made up of two islands Pulau Gemia and Pulau Kapas. Pulau Kapas is about easy access, choices and plenty of bargain. Places to stay ranging from camping sites to dormitory to island resorts with en suite facilities. Only thing that never change on this island is the constant number of backpackers arriving and departing each day.

 July, August and the local holidays are the best times to go.
An island famous for its clear waters, sandy white beaches and swaying palms, it is relatively isolated. Home to an infinite variety of hard and soft corals, the waters around the island abound with sea-shells, fish and turtles. 
The island's laid back atmosphere is ideal for relaxation but the more adventurous will find it is also a haven for swimming, snorkeling, windsurfing, kayaking, boating and fishing. 
Kapas has somehow become the refuge of those who refuse or could not join the Perhentian' crowd.
The island is favorite with the local people in the very high season and the public holidays. 



A taxi from Kuala Terengganu airport or the bus terminal costs RM 30.00 per cab for the journey to Marang Jetty. Boat transfer service may start as early as 7:00 and costs RM 25.00 per person (two way).
Services such as snorkelling around the island is very much standardised and priced accordingly. The standard price of equipment is RM5 per day for mask & tuba and RM5 per day for fins.
Tourist are never been over charged on these services. The only item that sometimes may seemed over priced are the food. Be sure that all menu has price listed before ordering.
Just north of the pier, a couple of small restaurants serves the cheapest basic dishes of the island : Nasi or Mee Goreng. The first one gives good portions and sell big bottle of mineral water. One of the best local eating place on this island is at Zaki's. 
Due to its close proximity to shore, Pulau Kapas is exposed to the occasional visits from unwelcome parties.
Be sure that any valuables is locked in the room or better still be carried along where ever you go. Local islanders is always helpful and on the watch for these trouble makers. Anyone caught on any unlawful acts will be deal with accordingly. However, they did not guarantee that your belonging will not be stolen. Mosquito can be a serious nuisance at dusk and dawn. Most resorts have mosquito net but for the outdoors, bring enough repellent.

Tucked within breezy coconut groves, traditional huts adorn selected stretches of the spotless beach. Leisurely splashing and snorkelling around with a playful but shy variety of fishes are pleasant and undemanding pursuits. Play spot the turtles and pay your silent underwater tribute to the colours of the sea shells besides wind-surfing, kayaking and boating.
Previously a well-guarded secret amongst members of the diving community, Kapas has now become more accessible with the building of the Primula Kapas Island Resort.
Pulau Kapas offers a variety of adventures to the Sun and Sea lovers. The hidden sweats of nature's splendors both on land and below the sea. You could track into the island's interior and amazed at the colorful natural flora and fauna along the way. Explore the most varied marine life among the many coral reefs around the island. Snorkeling and underwater diving is popular along stretches of shallow coral reefs of the island's western shore.

Kapas, a view from Marang

Sungai Congkak

" Sungai Congkak is one of Selangor’s most favourite local haunts. All along the scenic river you can see stalls selling food and beverages, jungle produce and other knick-knacks for a typical picnic goer or camper."


Enterprising locals have set up wooden/bamboo huts by the gentle and long river for families or couples to seek shelter and have picnics in, charging RM5-7 per booth. Others set up parking grounds at RM2 to 3 per vehicle.
Drive up to the end of the road to reach the Sungai Congkak Forest Reserve entrance, which is managed by Tourism Selangor Sdn. Bhd. For those interested in staying overnight, you have a choice of chalets (1-12 people), campsites (4-6 people) and canopies. 
The air is breezy and cool. On weekends when the place is packed with locals having a fun day out with friends and family, enticing smells of meat being barbequed fills the air. The chortles of happy children playing in the water and giggles of teenage girls posing for photos add to the merriment of the popular picnic spot.   On a tranquil weekday, there is a sense of quietness and repose amidst the sound of running waters and rustling leaves. 
The entrance fee is RM1 per person (12 years and above).

Botanical Garden in Penang

 
Botanical Garden in Penang or waterfall garden as it is popularly referred as is not only a popular tourist destination but it is a life time experience which casts a mystic spell on its visitors. Amidst the var5ious parks and gardens the Botanical Garden in Penang has created a distinct position for itself. Features of Botanical Garden in Penang
About malaysia...................



  -  Botanical Garden in Penang came into existence from 1884 and the plethora of natural heritage mark the exuberance of this famous tourist destination which is the only one of its kind in Malaysia.
  -  Botanical Garden in Penang is enveloped by a cascading brook that strolls through a extensive 29 hectares of prime and undulating grounds and the lush greenery and tranquil setting.
  -  The creative design of the Gardens was indeed a major accomplishment for it mingles naturally with the setting of the tropical rainforests.




  -  Botanical Garden in Penang was acknowledged as the healthy recreational gardens and tourist destination by the Health Ministry of Malaysia.
  -  Botanical Garden in Penang offers a wide range of facilities including Recreational / Picnic areas, toilets, wheelchair access walkways, bandstand, gazebos, jogging tracks, jungle trails, resting lawns and plant nursery.

  -  Botanical Garden in Penang remains open on all the days of the year from 5.00 am to 8.00 pm and there is no entrance fee
 About Malaysia......
Sumanje Love it...

Snake Temple in Penang

Fast Facts of Snake Temple in Penang
Address- Sungai Kluang near Bayan Lepas airport, Penang
Special Occasion- Chor Soo Kong's birthday on the sixth day of the first lunar month
Snake Temple in Penang reveres the divine powers of Chor Soo Kong, a Buddhist monk. This monk is known to have moved to Penang and had healing capabilities. During Chor Soo Kong's birthday on the sixth day of the first lunar month, devotees from other South-east Asian countries like Singapore, come to this temple. Built in 1850, the temple has a statue of Chor Soo Kong, which was brought to Penang by a monk from China. According to legends, the monk used to offer shelter to the snakes of the jungle, all of which moved into the temple once it was completely built.

Features of Snake Temple in Penang
  -  The temple was originally known as the "Temple of the Azure Cloud" to celebrate the beauty of Penang's sky.
  -  Located at Sungai Kluang near Bayan Lepas airport in the Penang Island, Snake   -  Temple in Penang, also hosts several snakes.
  -  You can burn incense at the incense burner kept in front of the temple.
  -  Incense is also burned in the main prayer hall
  -  The smoke of the incense is believed to make the snakes harmless
  -  The snakes are also de-venomed at this temple.

Penang Museums

Penang Museums

Penang museums would take one back to by gone times and help understand the way of life in Penang. These museums conserve and educate about the past and help understand the present. There are several museums in Penang that are popular attraction amongst the tourists. Forestry Museum in Penang built on a vast 247-acre park displays various original native species of flora and fauna, as well as insects, lizards, and snakes.
Penang Museum and Art Gallery is a beautiful landmark that is the home of old photographs, maps, charts and historical relics. The Penang Museum and Art Gallery is acknowledged as the homage to the inhabitants of Penang Island and it reflects the cultural composition of the state and emphasizes on unity in diversity.

Penang Toy Museum is Asia’s first and largest museum comprising of more than 100,000 collectibles of international brands, this museum allures visitors from all age group. Penang Toy Museum is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Tanjung Bungah area.
The Penang War Museum vividly depicts the saga of tragedy and distress that engulfed Malaysia during the Second World War. Penang along with the rest of Malaysia faced the torment of losing countless lives, tearing families apart, scarcity of food and the turmoil that ravaged the entire nation.

Penang Festivals & Events

Penang in Malaysia is known for its festive spirit across the world. You will find plenty of social, religious and communal festivals being celebrated here throughout the year. Some festivals are held to usher in the New Year or the new season marking the beginning or end of their harvesting time while, some are occasions to attract tourists from across the world to showcase the traditional and cultural richness of the land. You will be amazed by the galore of legends, customs and faith associated with Penang Festivals and Events.

Festivals and Events in Penang, are just excuse to make the land vibrant with fun, amusement and frolic. And for you these are opportunities to explore the beautiful Penang Island, where so many different communities stay with the bondage of fraternity and harmony. You will find Indians, Chinese and all different communities celebrating their own festivals in this multi-colored land. As a result, this can be a golden chance for you to learn about the land and its faith, its people, their individual culture and customs in all the heights of grandeur.

During Penang Festivals and Events, people involve themselves in various social activities and even invite the tourists to participate in amusement and entertainment. On one hand, the festivals are celebrated with all rigidity and on the other, garbed in the best of dresses, people savor these occasions to relive their spirit with happiness and peace. Thus, just get hold of Penang Festivals and Events to make the most of your trip to this island.

Wildlife and National Parks in Penang

Wildlife and National Parks in Penang should be your destination if you are a wild life enthusiast. Exotic and amazing, the wild life varieties along with the rich flora and plant life make it a home for a good number of wild species.

Expect to see more than 1,000 species of plants and trees mainly dominated by the family Dipterocarpaceae, Leguminaceae, Anacardiaceae, Euphorbiaceae and Moraceae. Seraya or Shorea curtisii, which is also a commercial timber tree, is a common type in the park.
A whooping 190 species of fauna were recorded here, including 28 species of mammals, 14 species of reptiles, 148 species of birds and various species of insects and amphibians. Long tailed Macaque is the most common wildlife species and can be spotted especially at the beach areas and mangrove forests.

Penang National Park
Taman Negara Pulau Pinang is the first National Park created under the National Parks Act of 1980. The establishment of this park reflects the importance of conserving this biological diversity-rich area. The aim is to conserve and protect wildlife, marine life, plants and objects.

Features of Penang National Park
- This park covers an area of 2,563 hectare and is bordered by the George Town metropolitan area and the sea.
- The 1,182 hectare of land includes beaches and hills and is rich in flora and fauna.
- The Park's ecosystem is a diversity of habitats with hills, sandy and rocky beaches, streams and coastal forests representing much of the natural habitats of Penang.
- Small mammals such as tree shrews or tupai glis, slow loris, flying lemur, civet cats, lepoard cats, sea otters and pangolins have been spotted.
- The Park is also home to many birds, reptiles, amphibians and of course the famous turtles, especially the Green turtles, the Ridley turtles, the Leatherback turtles and the Hawksbill turtles.
- Pulau Pinang National Park offers vast opportunities for research, education, recreation and ecotourism activities such as climbing, trekking, swimming, wildlife observation or simply enjoying the natural environment.

PENENG BRIDGE






Popular as the third longest bridge in the world, Penang Bridge facilitates the link between Gelugor on the island of Penang to Seberang Prai on the Malay Peninsula. This bridge of Penang in Malaysia, which was opened to public transport in in1985, also leads to the North-South Expressway in Prai and Jelutong Expressway in Penang. Before this bridge in Penang, 13.5 kilometers in length, was built, the connectivity between Penang and the mainland of Malaysia was carried out by ferry services that you could avail from Butterworth to Georgetown.
Features of Penang Bridge
  -  The Penang Bridge International Marathon is held annually to commemorate the opening of Penang Bridge
  -  During this marathon, traffic is suspended on the bridge for hours. This is the only time of the year when the bridge is closed for several hours.
  -  The Municipal Council of Penang Island, Malaysian Highway Authority and the Penang Government jointly with the Penang Amateur Athletic Association, the Penang Youth and Sports Department , University Science Malaysia, Penang Tourism Action Council and Penang Bridge Sdn Bhd, organizes this event.
  -  Another bridge, Penang Second Bridge will also be built by the Malaysian government to tackle more transport
  -  Penang Bridge has close circuit television and an SOS facility during emergency
  -  Since its operation, this bridge levies toll on the vehicles
  -  Malaysian Highway Authority was its first concession body. However, since 1993, the role was taken up by a private concession company, Penang Bridge Sdn Bhd.